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Leadership Conference of Women Religious Assembly

At the 2018 Assembly  of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, the members  committed the Conference to work toward greater awareness of systemic racism and white privilege, their destructive consequences, and for their elimination.

Here is the LCWR Statement of Recommitment:
In the presence of constant and painful reminders of the deep roots of racism in our country, we the Leadership Conference of Women Religious reaffirm the 2016 Assembly Resolution and pledge to go deeper into the critical work of creating communion, examining the root causes of injustice and our own complicity, and purging ourselves, our communities, and our country of the sin of racism and its destructive effects.

Click here for the complete document.

On the last morning, the Assembly committed the Conference to work toward greater awareness of systemic racism and white privilege, their destructive consequences, and for their elimination. That led to a most moving witness. Across the street from the assembly  hotel is St. Louis' "old courthouse," where Dred Scott and his wife Harriet sued for their freedom. Enslaved, Dred and Harriet Scott had been brought by their owner into Missouri, then a free territory. When their owner attempted to return with them to a slave-holding state, the Scotts sued for their freedom. Their suit was denied and eventually appealed to the US Supreme Court which held that African Americans were not US citizens and could not sue ... and so Harriet and Dred Scott remained enslaved. All 850 participants in the LCWR Assembly processed silently to the courthouse and stood in silence on its steps, witnessing to our belief in the equality of all peoples and condemning the racism that plagues our country.
Here are additional photos from the silent witness.